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Today is opening day of the baseball season in case you don’t live in that universe.  The Sox opened with a loss at Baltimore and won’t be back home at Fenway for a few days, but here are some photos of opening days and years past at Fenway from the park’s construction in 1912 to opening day 1968.

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Photo of Inventor Nikola Tesla Holding a Phosphor-Coated Gas Discharge Lamp Powered by Wireless Electricity from Dr. Nikola Tesla and His Inventions, 1899.
This experiment, conducted in Colorado Springs, Colorado, was part of Tesla’s preparations for the creation of the wireless transmission project he would call Wardenclyffe in Shoreham on Long Island.  These experiments proved that Tesla could send electric current over the air and also provided a kind of proof of concept of the same principles that would power fluorescent light bulbs more than half a century later.

Photo of Inventor Nikola Tesla Holding a Phosphor-Coated Gas Discharge Lamp Powered by Wireless Electricity from Dr. Nikola Tesla and His Inventions, 1899.

This experiment, conducted in Colorado Springs, Colorado, was part of Tesla’s preparations for the creation of the wireless transmission project he would call Wardenclyffe in Shoreham on Long Island.  These experiments proved that Tesla could send electric current over the air and also provided a kind of proof of concept of the same principles that would power fluorescent light bulbs more than half a century later.

"Echo Lake and Profile House, Franconia Notch, NH," Kilburn Brothers Photographers, Late 19th Century and "Profile House," W.I. Hatch Company, Late 19th Century.

These stereoscopic images of the first “Profile House,” one of the most luxurious hotels in the white mountains, are some of the few images of the building remaining.  This first version of the hotel built in the middle of the 19th century was demolished in 1905 and replaced with a much larger hotel that burned to the ground in 1923.  The site of Profile House is now the parking lot for Cannon Mountain Ski Area.

Stereoscopic images like this were sold all over the world to tourists who would use them in stereoscope viewers in order to create the impression of a three dimensional image.  They operated on essentially the same principle as the Fisher Price/Disney Viewmaster toy you might have played with as a kid.

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A Visit to Berlin’s Abandoned Spreepark

To view more photos and videos from Spreepark, explore the Spreepark Berlin / Kulturpark Plänterwald location page.

Just outside Berlin lies Spreepark, an abandoned East German amusement park. Kulturpark Plänterwald, later known as Spreepark, opened in 1969 and at its peak was host to over a million visitors a year. In 2001, however, only 400,000 people visited the park and it was closed down the following year.

Today, locals and tourists alike risk the trespassing fine to view and capture Spreepark’s headless dinosaur sculptures, roller coaster cars filled with leaves and Ferris wheel that spins slowly in the wind. Maxim Mestovsky (@mestovsky), a user experience designer from Minsk, Belarus, recently visited Spreepark on a trip to Berlin and shared his experience on Instagram. “You have to take a train through a mountain and over a lake then climb a fence to get into the park, but when you do, it’s beautiful,” he says. “The old Ferris wheel creaks, abandoned boats are strewn about. I don’t understand why they don’t sell tickets still! Maybe that’s the charm of the park.”

Alfred Eisendstaedt Photographs of the Delegates at the Bretton Woods Conference at the Mount Washington Hotel, Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, July 1944 and Photograph of the Mount Washington Hotel.

The meeting of representatives from the 44 allied nations to create a new system of world finance in 1944 is, without doubt, the most important world historical event to happen in New Hampshire.  The conference led to the creation of what is now known as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.  Debates at the conference sought to balance Britain’s desire for an economic policy pursuing full employment and the United States’ hope to promote free trade.  The agreements, according to Henry Morgenthau at the time, were meant to bring an end to “economic nationalism.”

Also, there were a lot of great mustaches and suits.

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Pictured above is Edmonia Lewis (bottom), along with her sculptures The Death of Cleopatra (top left) and Forever Free (top right). 

I am not sure how to begin even trying to summarize the fascinating life of Edmonia Lewis and her sculptures. The Smithsonian magazine’s 1996 article on her does a far better job than I ever could, so I encourage you to check it out!

The Death of Cleopatra now resides in the Smithsonian American Art Museum (the source of the picture of it above). But the sculpture almost fell into complete obscurity after wowing the public at the Centennial Exposition of 1876 in Philadelphia. SAAM also has a brief biography on Edmonia that’s worth exploring. Wikipedia’s article on Lewis is also a fine place to start, given the number of great references and sources listed. It’s also the source of Lewis’s portrait above.

The photo of Forever Free (top rightis from the book Emancipation and the Freed in American Sculpture, A Study in Interpretation by Freeman Henry Morris Murray that can be found in our collection of books online. The sculpture is now in the collection of the Howard University Gallery of Art. The author, Freeman Henry Morris Murray, is fascinating in his own right, being dubbed the first Black art historian. (He doesn’t have a Wikipedia page, for all you Wikipedians out there who would like to volunteer.)

The life Edmonia Lewis forged at a time when being anything but white or male would almost certainly relegate you to the dustbin of history stands as an inspiration. Do yourself a favor and don’t resist exploring more.